Meet the new members of the City Council




Pictured are the new members of the City Council.
Surprising news, Frank Kruesi, president of the CTA (Chicago Transit Authority) resigned. Does it make anyone feel better that Ron Huberman, has hands on experience because he drove a bus while in college?
Earlier this year, Phil Cline, Police Superintendent resigned, and they are narrowing down the recruiting agency to three that find another Police Superintendent, three weeks after Phil Cline resigned. It should be another 3 weeks to pick a recruiting agency. Then how much longer will the agency take?


CTA Frank Kruesi replaced
Chicago Transit Authority president Frank Kruesi resigned today amid a massive railway reconstruction project and complaints about service on the buses and trains that serve 1.5 million riders a day.
Mayor Richard Daley immediately recommended the CTA board hire his chief of staff, Ron Huberman, to replace Kruesi, who spent almost a decade at the helm of the nation's second-largest transit system.
"I want him to examine the CTA from top to bottom," Daley said of Huberman, who has been Daley's right hand man for two years and previously headed the city's Office of Emergency Management and Communications.
It's not clear what Kruesi will do next, and Daley dodged a question about whether Kruesi would be involved in the city's bid for the 2016 Summer Olympics. Chicago beat out Los Angeles to be the U.S. Olympic Committee's bid city, and Chicago's mass transit system was something officials touted.
"It's time for me to do something else. I'm ready to do something else," said Kruesi, who previously was an assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Transportation.
At the news conference, Huberman said he had hands-on transportation experience because he drove a school bus for three years while in college. He said he was committed to belt-tightening at the CTA and other changes because "the mayor has made it clear to me that everything's on the table."

Cook County fires medical examiner The only thing is I feel bad when I see so many very elderly working, because they have to, and Virgil might be one of them.
Southtown caught Poole driving for work while using invalid license
An 86-year-old Glenwood man might be back on the road in his battered little silver Kia, but he won't be driving for Cook County any longer, officials said Thursday.
Virgil M. Poole was fired Wednesday from his job as a Cook County medical examiner after he lied to them about having his driver's license canceled, a spokesman said.
Poole's erratic driving and invalid license were uncovered in a Daily Southtown investigation that followed him for more than 60 miles as he made his way March 14across the South Side from funeral home to funeral home. His license already had been canceled for more than a week.
While traveling from the Stein Institute, 2121 W. Harrison St., to area funeral homes to examine bodies of people who likely had died of natural causes, Poole ran red lights, cut off semi-trucks and swerved across yellow dividing lines.
Poole had been suspended without pay March 21, pending administrative hearings. Poole and his union representatives presented evidence at a hearing last Friday that his license was reinstated April 3.
His union fought to keep him in his $30,000-a-year job, but county authorities decided to fire Poole because he "misled them about his driving privileges," county spokesman Steve Mayberry said.

Cook County Settlements approvedDorota Spyrka came to Stroger Hospital in June 2000 suffering from pneumonia. But the 41-year-old Polish immigrant developed a pulmonary embolism, and after a doctor cut off the drug helping her recover, she died.
Now, Cook County taxpayers will pay the family of the Chicago woman, who was a married mother of two, $10 million to settle their lawsuit.
A $950,000 settlement for the 2003 death of county jail inmate Marie O'Donnell-Smith and $950,000 more for the 2004 death of Kanisha Banks' newborn at Provident Hospital.

A $350,000 payment to the family of Michael Kruse, a jail inmate whom attorneys said died while pleading for medical care, and $335,000 for the 2003 death of Carol Sell, who died months after she fell through revolving doors at the Markham courthouse.

A $160,000 settlement to county employee Wendell Reyes, who complained that he was denied a job at Provident because he's Asian-American.

The board also approved a $4.5 million settlement with AT&T, which agreed to reimburse the county for improper fees.

8 Comments:

  1. SP Biloxi said...
    "Virgil M. Poole was fired Wednesday from his job as a Cook County medical examiner after he lied to them about having his driver's license canceled, a spokesman said."

    My goodness. What took the city that long to figure Mr. Poole out? And is there more employees working at city jobs with an invalid driver's license and/or expired/no car insurance?
    Third Generation Chicago Native said...
    Did you see the settlements they paid out? Taking a woman off her medication, then she dies.

    Now the City is finding and agency to pick to find a Police superintendant, no wonder it takes forever to get anything done.
    SP Biloxi said...
    "A $350,000 payment to the family of Michael Kruse, a jail inmate whom attorneys said died while pleading for medical care, and $335,000 for the 2003 death of Carol Sell, who died months after she fell through revolving doors at the Markham courthouse."

    Now that is a shame! $350k payment for a death? No money in the world can replace someone's death. How can you put a price tag on someone's death? Very disturbing...
    Third Generation Chicago Native said...
    Expect these settlement to rise and become more frequent with all the cuts in the medical.
    SP Biloxi said...
    Oh brother....
    KittyBowTie1 said...
    Umm, WTF on an 86-year-old driving around the mean streets of Chicago? I take The Train. At least someone tried to check to make sure the guy still had a valid license.
    walter mitty said...
    third generation,

    Expect more payouts like this not just in the health care system but also in the legal system. Not only will there be more folks falling through the cracks in the jails and the juvenile detention center, but there will also be more wrongful convictions and malpractice actions as the already underfunded State and PD's are stretched even thinner.
    Levois said...
    That's a nice shot of the 87th Street Station.

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